The Foggy View News

The Foggy View is the newsletter of the Palos Verdes-South Bay Group with the Angeles Chapter of the Sierra Club. Our group includes those members residing in Carson, Gardena, Harbor City, Hermosa Beach, Lawndale, Lomita, Manhattan Beach, Redondo Beach, Palos Verdes Peninsula, San Pedro, Torrance and Wilmington. 


Become an Outings Leader

Before too long we’ll be able to have group hikes and other outings. Be ready. Become a leader! 

Watching and Listening to Birds—Just What the Doctor Ordered!

By Susan Rothrock Deo Have you found yourself listening to the birds singing more since the pandemic started? You are not alone, and it’s not just because there are fewer human-caused sounds since we are home more. According to Mary Forgione, in her May 7 Los Angeles Times article, “Research shows that listening to birdsong…

Links of Interest

A pilot program to shuttle folks to the Palos Verdes Nature Preserve from RPV Civic Center will begin in March. Daily Breeze Art, plastics and politics Southern Sierran Biden’s plan to conserve 30% of U.S. land and water by 2030 could aid environmental justice. Inside Climate News.

Vote! By Cheryl Frick

And don’t forget to vote in the Angeles Chapter elections: votePVSB.angsc.orgYour voter ID is in the SOCAL NOW newsletter

Sierra Club response to recent wildfires in California

By Michael Brune, Sierra Club Executive Director Our hearts are heavy as the losses from this year’s wildfires continue to mount. We mourn for those who have lost loved ones, homes and livelihoods. We feel for all those suffering from dangerously smoky air, including our own Sierra Club family, whose lives have been shaken by…

Zoltan Stroll

It is with great sadness that we inform our members of the passing of Zoltan Stroll, a member of the Palos Verdes-South Bay Sierra Club for more than 20 years.  He was an avid hiker with our group and became a leader in 2010. He also served on the Executive Committee and was our Treasurer…

Land Conservancy reduces fire risk in Palos Verdes Nature Preserve

Arborist crew removing acacia shrubs from the Palos Verdes Nature Preserve. Photo: Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy/pvplc.org By Adrienne Mohan, Executive Director Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy While some wildfires are part of nature’s natural cycle, the images of flames burning Southern California hillsides and neighboring homes is alarming.  Since its founding in 1988, the…

Lizard Love

By Susan Rothrock Deo Walking my dog in early April, I found this pair of southern alligator lizards, Elgaria multicarinata, on a neighboring block. I watched them for several minutes and they didn’t move. I wasn’t sure what they were doing, so I did some research and learned they have a unique mating ritual. The male…

State allows power plants to continue harmful cooling method

By Melanie Cohen, Environmental Co-Chair In 2010, after decades of complaints from environmentalists, California water regulators ordered 19 coastal power plants to phase out a cooling process that is blamed for killing billions of marine organisms every year. In “once-through cooling” (OTC) power plants pump huge amounts of water from a nearby ocean or river…

Talkin’ ‘Bout My Generation

Talkin’ ‘Bout My Generation By Judy Herman, Foggy View Editor My Generation, a campaign of the California Sierra Club, is fighting for an equitable transition to a fully electrified economy powered by 100% clean, renewable energy. Volunteer leaders, especially young people, drive community mobilization across the state. The word “Generation” in the name has a…

Links of Interest

The Forest Committee of Sierra Club’s Angeles Chapter launches a series of programs on wildfire Annals of a warming planet: The West Coast wildfires are Apocalypse, Again. The New Yorker Severe burn damage from California wildfires seen from space. Live Science A toxic secret lurks in deep sea off the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Los Angeles…

Along the Path: The El Segundo Blue Returns

By Susan Rothrock Deo Slideshow: 1-4 Tracy Drake, 5 Eva Cicoria, 6 Susan Deo, 7 Paul Blieden I scanned the prolific clusters of flowers, scattered like pink tinged cotton balls, across the bushy plant. The plant was maybe three feet wide by two feet high so it took a while. The people walking by on…

Links of Interest

Racist Urban Planning Left Some Neighborhoods to Swelter Black or Hispanic areas…up to 20 degrees F hotter in summer. (New York Times) Why Does California Have So Many Wildfires? (New York Times)

What’s Your Experience with the Outdoors in Other Countries?

I’ve noticed that different countries have different ideas about what constitutes a national park. For example, in Cuba and Vietnam, the people who traditionally worked the land that was later designated a national park are allowed to stay there and continue farming. I was taken aback when I visited Cuba’s Viñales national park and saw…

National Parks: An Intriguing Way to See the World

By Susan Rockroth Deo How many national parks have you visited? Our family keeps a list. Some of us even have national park “passports” to stamp at every U.S. park we visit. In Dudhwa we went on tiger hunts (of the camera kind) riding on the back of a trained elephant—the only way to go!…

Why is the Sierra Club Involved in Politics?

By Al Sattler Alternate Chapter Rep Recently, I was asked why the Sierra Club is involved in politics. Many people mainly think of the Sierra Club as doing hikes and other outings. However, it is important to remember that the Sierra Club Mission Statement begins with “To Explore, Enjoy, and Protect the wild places of…

Wildflowers in Your Yard

By Al Sattler, Alternate Chapter Representative You don’t need to drive to the Poppy Preserve in Lancaster to see poppies…you can plant them in your yard. Some annual wildflowers can thrive even in a small space. These pictures are California Poppies and Elegant Clarkia in a parkway strip, with rosemary and lantana behind them. Lupine…

Racism, Covid-19 and Oil Drilling Are Conected

By Melanie Cohen, Conservation Co-Chair California has long produced some of the dirtiest, most carbon-intensive crude oil in the world, with operations taking place dangerously close to homes, schools, hospitals and other sensitive sites. Proximity to oil development is associated with adverse health effects including asthma and other respiratory illnesses, which increase the risk of…

Invisible Friends

Text and photographs by Emile Fiesler Gardeners encounter numerous animals that enjoy feeding on the plants in their gardens.  These animals are typically labeled “pests.” There are other animals that prey on these pests, and these are typically labeled “beneficial.”  A number of beneficial insects are used as so-called biological control agents, as opposed to…

Links of Interest: Environmental Justice

Racism is Killing the Planet by Hop Hopkins, Sierra Club director of strategic partnerships (Sierra Magazine) Sierra Club’s Environmental Justice Program Black Environmentalists Talk About Climate and Anti-Racism (New York Times) “Both political racism and environmental racism are drivers of our excess pollution and climate denialism.” Energy Justice Network How Residents of South LA Are…

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.

Can’t find what you’re looking for? Search the site.

%d bloggers like this: